business & commercial Litigation

Contractors in construction disputes need proper legal guidance

The process of taking a building project from plan to completion features many interdependent parts, offering numerous opportunities for conflicts to arise. As a contractor, you understand just how frequently these conflicts occur.

Perhaps some subcontractor or another delivered a substandard product or claimed that they delivered work which was not completed.

Maybe the client who hired you disapproves of the end product, even though you delivered all aspects of the plan to completion within the standards that you both agreed to.

Perhaps your client believed that you would cover some aspect of the project that was not clear in the contract, and expects you to take the hit.

No matter what your construction dispute may be, settling it fairly while protecting your reputation usually requires proper legal representation. A strong legal defense understands how to examine nuances in the law to keep your rights protected.

Many kinds of disputes require legal defense

If you serve as a contractor for a project, then you should absolutely examine your contract and make sure that both parties agree on the terms before stepping onto the worksite.

Unfortunately, many opportunities get underway before the contract defining the job is properly vetted. It is highly possible that your construction conflict derives from each side interpreting the contract differently.

One of the most common types of conflict arises when the client and the contractor disagree about the scope of the job. This is especially common when it comes to renovations of existing structures where the lines can get blurry about the contractor's responsibility to pre-existing elements of the structure.

Similarly, you may be having subcontractor issues that are killing your bottom line. Perhaps you hired a framing crew who came in, knocked out their portion of the work and moved on. Several phases later, some element of the framing is causing issues for the drywall crew. To truly deal with the issue will be expensive, because now it entails undoing some of the electrical installation.

It is possible that the issue is with the design, and the architects or engineers simply created a conflict they did not foresee. It is also possible that the framers misread the plans and the mistake was not caught until it caused a problem for the drywall.

In cases like these, and many others, it is crucial to have an experienced legal team that can dig in to the fine print and determine exactly who is at fault and how to remedy the situation.

A strong team creates strong results

A strong legal defense can help ensure that you don't have to sacrifice your reputation to fight an unfair accusation against your work.

With proper representation, you can rest assured that whatever the source of the conflict is, your rights remain protected throughout the process.

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